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18-Sep-2017 05:54

are the series’ Scottie Fergusons, unraveled not by the chase, but the capture.

Though I want to put on my Stefon voice and say, this show has everything—the relentlessly funny John Early, as the fast-unraveling Elliott Goss; a Marge Gunderson figure on the characters’ trail; a guest arc for J.

While both the daily news and victims’ lived experiences prove the longevity a series like this could and should have, the first season’s ten perfect episodes did give sorority girl Jules’ (Eliza Bennett) recovery/revenge arc a satisfying conclusion, and brought her friendship with Kennedy (Aisha Dee) and partnership with Ophelia (Taylor Dearden) to equal emotional satisfaction.

It also modeled how allyship, both from non-victimized women and from the “not all” faction of men in the world, can be executed, even (or especially) when done so imperfectly. gave us the light-hearted comic-book action and Netflix’s quartet of interwoven series showcased the grittier side of superheroes, FX’s first partnership with Marvel embraces the insanity of a lesser-known X-Men character, making you forget it has any shared DNA with those blockbuster men in super-suits.

Despite a false step or two, this is still appointment viewing, and nothing generates nearly the volume of conversation.

In its penultimate season, Game of Thrones remains one of TV’s best stories. The Vietnam War Network: PBS In the spring of 1975, after the strains of “White Christmas” signaled the conclusion of the United States’ foolhardy sojourn in Southeast Asia, the CIA’s Saigon station chief, Thomas Polgar, composed his final wire to Washington.

Season Three of their painfully funny comedy Catastrophe confirms this fact once again: The fusion of these two charmingly warped minds makes for a viewing experience that likens life in all its unpredictability.

When we polled Paste editors, staff writers, and contributors on the best TV shows of 2017, more than 60 series received at least one vote—already a slim 15% or so of the total number of original scripted series to air this year.

To narrow that “shortlist” to 25 titles was an almost impossible, often thankless task; an alternate list, made up entirely of programs that missed the cut, would still keep you entertained for a good chunk of next year.

Let us hope that we will not have another Vietnam experience, and that we have learned our lesson.” These are old saws, of course, so oft repeated as to demand a certain skepticism, but in PBS’ 10-part, 18-hour examination of that long, lost fight, appearing at a moment in which the past’s dread echoes cannot be ignored, old saws cut deep.

Indeed, it is by marshaling the familiar images and frequent phrases of that tumultuous era into a single, stricken epic that The Vietnam War becomes the most thorough screen treatment of the conflict since its ignominious end, and perhaps the definitive one: What it lacks in the immediacy of Emile de Antonio’s In the Year of the Pig, the Winterfilm Collective’s Winter Soldier, Peter Davis’ Hearts and Minds, and the thousands of hours of ghastly footage that Americans watched from the dinner table in the 1960s and 1970s, Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s indispensable docuseries regains from the sheer grandeur of its portrait, and from its plaintive understanding that the war was the hinge on which the optimism of “the American century” swung firmly, irrevocably shut. black-ish Network: ABC Ours is not a country that has been kind to its black citizens. Creator Kenya Barris and his writers have been particularly adept in 2017, from an Inauguration-related “Lemons” that gives star Anthony Anderson one of the best monologues in recent TV history to the musically-inclined fourth season opener, “Juneteenth.” (Not to mention covering other pressing topics, like post-partum depression).

Season Three of their painfully funny comedy Catastrophe confirms this fact once again: The fusion of these two charmingly warped minds makes for a viewing experience that likens life in all its unpredictability.

When we polled Paste editors, staff writers, and contributors on the best TV shows of 2017, more than 60 series received at least one vote—already a slim 15% or so of the total number of original scripted series to air this year.

To narrow that “shortlist” to 25 titles was an almost impossible, often thankless task; an alternate list, made up entirely of programs that missed the cut, would still keep you entertained for a good chunk of next year.

Let us hope that we will not have another Vietnam experience, and that we have learned our lesson.” These are old saws, of course, so oft repeated as to demand a certain skepticism, but in PBS’ 10-part, 18-hour examination of that long, lost fight, appearing at a moment in which the past’s dread echoes cannot be ignored, old saws cut deep.

Indeed, it is by marshaling the familiar images and frequent phrases of that tumultuous era into a single, stricken epic that The Vietnam War becomes the most thorough screen treatment of the conflict since its ignominious end, and perhaps the definitive one: What it lacks in the immediacy of Emile de Antonio’s In the Year of the Pig, the Winterfilm Collective’s Winter Soldier, Peter Davis’ Hearts and Minds, and the thousands of hours of ghastly footage that Americans watched from the dinner table in the 1960s and 1970s, Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s indispensable docuseries regains from the sheer grandeur of its portrait, and from its plaintive understanding that the war was the hinge on which the optimism of “the American century” swung firmly, irrevocably shut. black-ish Network: ABC Ours is not a country that has been kind to its black citizens. Creator Kenya Barris and his writers have been particularly adept in 2017, from an Inauguration-related “Lemons” that gives star Anthony Anderson one of the best monologues in recent TV history to the musically-inclined fourth season opener, “Juneteenth.” (Not to mention covering other pressing topics, like post-partum depression).

Rather, as time marches on—Season Two is set between the Suez Crisis, in 1956, and the Profumo affair, in 1963—the series elaborates a thoughtful style and episodic structure that fleshes out the supporting characters, including Elizabeth’s husband, Philip (Matt Smith), and sister, Margaret (the standout Vanessa Kirby), by turning the focus away from the queen herself.